Combs

Spotlight on Rangoli – Bespoke Jewellery

Time for some proper sparkly girly fun! When it comes to being a one-of-a-kind bride, one easy (and not to mention beautiful) ways to bring some of The Quirk Factor to your wedding is to commission your own piece of bridal jewelery. But if you’re a bit stumped as to where to start, or what the process entails, fear not. Today we are joined by the lovely Aisling from Rangoli Jewelery who’s on hand to guide us through the process, and to share with us some of her past creations.

Aisling in her studio

This lovely lady has been designing for brides since 1998 – choosing this niche because she wanted to design for individuals rather than supply retail outlets. Most of her work is made to order, which allows for pieces to be easily customised. “I get great feedback from my clients about how much they enjoy being involved in the design process”, she says.

Aisling works from a beautiful studio in Dublin’s historic Design Tower at Grand Canal Quay which is exactly the type of special gem of a place that you get to visit when you’re planning a wedding. Oh dear, that pun was not intended.

 

Bow Comb

This bow comb was designed to go with this very simple white dress with a satin bow as the only embellishment.

 

Aisling’s Advice for brides who are thinking of having a bespoke piece of jewellery made

[box]

Firstly, allow yourself and your designer a reasonable lead time! This is an enjoyable experience and you don’t want to rush it.

Start gathering together ideas and images that reflect your personal style. These could be a selection of magazine tears or images saved online using for example, Pinterest. Get a feel for what you love!

Look at lots of accessories and make note of elements that you like…and don’t. It could be the form or the way the piece is positioned in the hairstyle. These elements can be worked into your design.

Collect as many images of your dress as you can. In particular, close-ups of any unusual features or embellishment. Fabric samples are helpful too.

Come along with your ideas and be open to advice from your designer. They will be able to offer expert advice on styling your overall look.

Get involved – it’s lots of fun!

[/box]

 

What is the ordering/consultation process?

The first meeting involves a chat – I want to find out about your style as well as the dress you have chosen! I’m interested in whether you’re planning a black-tie event or a ceremony on a hillside in Tuscany. What words sum up your celebration?

I look at many elements such as the lines and structure of the dress, the embellishment or surface decoration as well as the overall style. Hairstyles are important too. Some of you will come in with a clear idea of what you would like, while others ask me to totally design the piece for them. It’s absolutely fine to have no idea what you’re looking for!

The next thing I do is produce some design sketches and possibly small samples. The final design is generally worked out at a second appointment through discussion and selecting your choice of beading.

 

Aisling designed this bespoke comb to match a beautiful vintage Dirty Fabulous bridesmaid dress

 

When it comes to bridal jewellry, is less more or is it better to go all-out?

Everyone has their own individual style which I totally repect. My style advice for weddings is that ‘less is more’. This does not mean you have to have a minimal look. In my opinion, the dress should take centre stage and the accessories should complement rather than compete with the overall look. I’m also, (mostly), an advocate of not wearing a necklace as I think they can interfere with the neckline of the dress. There are no rules though!

 

Siobhan was left a pearl necklace by her Grandmother. Her Nana wore it on her wedding day and honeymoon to Ireland. The necklace got damaged over the years so Siobhan wanted to have it made into a bracelet.

 

What are the new trends for 2011/2012?

Trends come and go, so make sure you choose something that reflects you! This is probably your first and hopefully last experience of accessorising a wedding gown. Your bridal look may not be the same as your ‘going out’ look, so seek expert advice.

Here’s a selection of ‘What’s Hot’ in bridal accessories at the moment. Styles tend to evolve slowly but I discover the latest trends from following lots of Irish and International blogs! Lisa tell me what 2012 holds :-)

  • Statement side feature combs and hairbands are still really popular. A side piece is a little alternative and so chic!
  • Delicate hair-vines or Grecian-inspired pieces are popular for floaty dress styles
  • Beaded forehead headpieces are inspiring the bohemian style bride
  • Bird-cage headpieces are still popular but only suit very particular dress styles
  • Statement drop earrings can replace a necklace
  • Both fine and cuff-style bracelets will not compete with your neckline

 

What are the benefits of having a bespoke piece designed?

Everything that you choose to wear on the day will hold special memories for you. Having a bespoke piece designed is a really personal experience. Feedback from clients has been so positive – it’s proper sparkly girly fun!

 

The finished piece – Nana’s necklace is now a bracelet

 

So if you’re looking for that extra je ne sais quoi to put the final touches to your wedding day look, get in touch with Aisling and put your heads together. I can’t wait to see what the finished product is like!

 

  • You may be familiar with Aisling’s blog where she shares her creations and inspirations, and if not, now is the time to check it out!

Share the quirk

5 Comments

  1. Cris of Kiss My Tulle

    Great tips. Thanks for sharing!

  2. Great post! Love seeing the inspiration dress behind the bespoke pieces- they’re all beautiful!

  3. Thanks for inviting me to chat about my designs Lisa! I hope I’ve taken some of the mystery out of what is involved in having a special piece designed. Also, I forgot to mention that I have a range of pieces that can be purchased from stock.

  4. Stunning designs! Love everything!!!!

Leave a Comment